Blog

Views and news from our home in Fort Collins, Colorado.

We welcome your experiences and comments. Contact us, or email us directly at cycletote@cycletote.com

Oops, I crashed my bike

Safety Built In

If you wonder what would happen if your bike goes down while you have a trailer attached, watch this short video.

 Oops, I crashed my bike…now what?

If the bike is fine, your fine, then the trailer is likely to be fine too.  Even if you are banged and bruised, the trailer probably stayed upright.

we do our best to protect the trailer and its occupants from falling over with the rider.  Bicycle defensively to protect yourself and your cargo.  But  if the bike does tips over, the trailer has a good chance of remaining upright.

 

Ball Joint Design

Built into the nose of the tow bar,  a pivoting ball joint  moves around from side to side in a full circle.  It also moves front to back about 45 degrees.

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Nomadic Justin: Cycletote vs. DoggyRide

CycleTote review

We’re pleased to be featured in Nomadic Justin’s 300km Dog Trailer Review with notes about our Dog Trailer and customer service. Justin has ridden more than 40,000 km in his life and used a variety of equipment. His opinion is based on a lifetime of using bike products. Thank you, Justin!

CycleTote (Left) vs. DoggyRide

CycleTote (Left) vs. DoggyRide

 

Nomadic Justin's CycleTote Dog Trailer Setup

“Cycletote is a company that clearly understands what loaded touring really means and fully stands behind a product that is built for that purpose.”

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Food Runners Biking Food

Food Runners at capcity 8.18.14 (800x598)

With the help of their generous donors, Food Runners of San Francisco purchased two new CycleTote trailers to move food in the busy city center from restaurants, groceries and businesses to local donation sites.  For the past 27 years the food has been going from those who have too much to those who need it.

SOMA

San Francisco is in the middle of a tech boom.  The tech companies all serve in house meals daily.  Most of them are in SOMA (South of Market), the most traffic congested area of town, especially around rush hour.  All the major arteries to the Bay Bridge and the Peninsula have their main access into and out of SOMA.  Volunteers using bike trailers can pick up food in congested downtown areas where car parking is non-existent.

Food Runners Schedule

“The pick up requests pour in after lunch, starting around 1:30-2 thru 3:30-4.  You can’t get near most of the donor locations in a car after 2PM due to traffic and/or late afternoon parking restrictions. You can’t even pull over to the curb and wait for someone to bring the food out. ” says Nancy Hahn, the Director of Operations for Food Runners.

She continued by saying “Last fall,we thought bikes with trailers would be a good solution.  We started in December with a trailer cobbled together by our first courier.  When it was stolen , a former Food Runners volunteer donated her Cycletote Trailer.  The Cycletote trailer turned out to have just the perfect dimensions to fit the large foil trays that the food is often packed in. Hence the beginning of a beautiful partnership!”

Food Runners 3

CycleTote full of Food Runners’ donations

Food Runners then purchased two more trailers.  Volunteer couriers generally make 2-3 ’rounds’ per shift (approx 4 hours).  A trailer can fit 15 of the large foil trays and the couriers have gotten clever about stacking whatever comes their way. ” We estimate that a trailer is picking up 1,000 pounds per week or approximately 750 meals,” Nancy explained. masaj salonu

Food Runners volunteers who are biking food are only a part of their food collecting.  In all, Food Runners estimates  volunteers deliver over 15 tons of food a week to agencies feeding people in need.  CycleTote is proud to be a part of there effort.  Their mission statement says it best, “Food Runners is a volunteer organization dedicated to alleviating hunger and preventing waste in San Francisco.”

Food Runners 4

 

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Girl Scouts Take on Cerebral Palsy

A Girl Scouts Brownie troop in Fort Collins, Colorado, wanted to do something special for Tyler, a first grader with cerebral palsy.  Together, eleven girls sold enough cookies to buy Tyler a CycleTote Special Needs bike trailer.

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Full Inclusion Program

Fort Collin’s Poudre School District schools have a full inclusion program, which means that children with special needs are fully included in classroom instruction and in school activities.  According to Ginger, one of the Brownie’s leader, “Tyler is a gregarious, fun, and warm 6 year old boy.  The Scouts love to push him around school, play with him at recess, and help him whenever they can.”

Tyler’s dad, Adam, had casually mentioned that Tyler had fun riding in a special needs trailer at the Windsor Turkey Trot.  Adam, who used to be a mountain and road bike rider until Tyler was born, is also excited about getting on a bike again. The CycleTote will give Tyler and Adam the freedom to ride together.

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Girl Scouts Present Trailer

 

At CycleTote, we were delighted to be a part of the girl’s plan.  Tyler and many of the girls live in our neighborhood.  In fact, we pass Tyler and Ginger’s houses multiple times a day and purchased our share of cookies when the girls came to our door.  Before the sale started, we took a trailer to the Brownies meeting so that they could see what they were working towards.  Tyler was also there and was given his first chance to sit in the trailer.

Girl Scouts Present Trailer

Then last week, the girls presented the new trailer to Tyler and took a bike ride around our neighborhood park. Everyone was excited, especially Tyler who was beaming the entire time.  We are very proud of all the girls and believe they gave a life-enriching gift to their classmate.

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Girl Scouts Present Trailer

 

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